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Split Pea Rosemary Soup

Try this delicious Split Pea Soup with Rosemary for dinner tonight 😋🍜

Ingredients:
* 6 slices of bacon, cut into 1 inch pieces
* 1 small onion, chopped
* 1 leek, sliced thin
* 1 large carrot, chopped
* 2 cloves garlic, minced
* 4 cans chicken broth
* 1 ½ cups green split peas
* 2 bay leaves
* 1 tsp fresh rosemary, chopped

Place bacon in a large pot, cook over medium – until crisp. Stir in onion, leek, carrot, and garlic; cook until the vegetables are soft (about 8 mins) Pour in chicken broth. Stir in split peas, bay leaves, and rosemary. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, cover, and simmer until peas are cooked (1 hour), stirring occasionally. Yum!

The Stressed Out Student

Are you a stressed out student? Here are some hints to help boost energy, increase memory and avoid feeling overwhelmed.

Firstly, start the day off right. This does not mean downing a cup of “Joe” after an all-nighter and expecting your body and brain to work up to snuff.

Start with a breakfast that includes protein. A herbal supplement called Rodiola has fantastic benefits for the stressed out student. It is not a stimulant, but will help your body better cope and help you avoid feeling burnt out. Another bonus – it improves memory.

We also recommend taking a good multi-vitamin and a B-complex. Many of the students that our clinic treats love B12 shots, which will increase their energy by providing the nutrients that their bodies crave during this stressful time.

Find some good study snacks – trail mix, hummus and veggies, popcorn with nutritional yeast. Don’t let yourself get drained in front of the books. Remember, your brain is getting a work out but your body still needs exercise as well. Get some fresh air and go for a run or to the gym. Or take a walk over to A New Leaf and we’ll find some simple solutions to minimize the midterm mayhem! Good luck as this semester wraps up!

Outdoor Winter Activities

It’s important to stay active even throughout the winter months. Fresh air works wonders on our digestive system, calms anxiety, cleans our lungs, and provides us with more energy and a sharper mind. We’re sharing our favorite outdoor winter activities.

  1. Build an outdoor winter bonfire and roast hot dogs or make s’mores.
  2. Grab some friends, rent snowshoes and go snowshoeing.
  3. Take your dog for a walk.
  4. On a snowy day, find a big hill and go sledding or tobogganing.
  5. During the Christmas season, attend outdoor light festivals or holiday Christmas markets.
  6. Build a fort and have a snowball fight with your kids (or spouse!)
  7. Take a blanket and a cup of hot chocolate and sit outside on your front porch swing.
  8. Go ice skating – the outdoor ice rink in downtown Vancouver is the perfect outdoor tradition.
  9. Shovel paths and sidewalks in the snow (your neighbors will love this one too.)
  10. Go on a winter picnic! Take blankets, sandwiches, and hot soup in a thermos. This is also a fun, inexpensive date idea.

Benefits of Nature Walks

A busy life can benefit greatly from the sweet outdoors and spending time in nature. Our nervous systems can easily become over-saturated by the bombardment of sights, sounds, smells, and the speed of modern life (especially a life lived in the city.) Our jobs and lives may have become juggling acts, with demands of our time and having the ability to multitask. The peace and tranquility provided by nature can give us a break from this stress. Below we’ve included our favorite benefits reaped from nature walks!

  1. The chance to go somewhere quiet, like the woods or a walk along the river, provides us the reprieve from the noises that daily tax our sensitive nerves.
  2. When we spend time alone we are rewarded with the peace of only our own thoughts for company. Solitude is not selfish, it’s a basic necessity, as much as food and water. It’s something we can restore our energy levels with, such as going for a stroll along a wooded path or park area.
  3. Natural elements such as plants, trees, water, and sunlight have been said to absorb negative energy. Perhaps we feel calmer around them simply because they are part of the living world, therefore we feel connected to them, and yet they do not make any demands on us except to appreciate them. Take a walk in a quiet forest or on a country path, notice the beauty all around you and feel stress and tension evaporate.
  4. Nature walks can boost your immune system. The cell activity related to the health effects of a forest will help boost your immunity. Research shows that the natural environment benefits the function of a human being’s immune system and thus, healthier, longer lives.
  5. Nature has positive effects on mental health as well, therefore boosting longevity and overall health. The improved air quality, encouragement of physical activity, and recovery from attention, stress, and fatigue all add up to a much better quality of life.
  6. Walking provides a significant benefit because it helps to relieve stress. Brisk walks boost endorphins, the feel-good hormone that improves your mood, and can lower stress along with mild depression. Walking can also give you more energy which will help improve positive feelings.
  7. According to recent studies, walking through nature can put the brain into an actual meditative state, allowing you to pay attention to the world around you, while creating the calmness needed for reflection. It’s within this calm, quiet, reflective state that our creativity flourishes.

Both sensitivity and creativity blossom best when we give ourselves the time to walk around in the natural world, breathe in its refreshing air, and appreciate each moment as it passes by.

 

Sourced by: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/sense-and-sensitivity/201404/5-ways-walking-in-nature-benefits-sensitive-people

http://www.whollyhealthyblog.com/fitness/exercises/hiking-health-5-benefits-taking-nature-walk/